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The Artificial Intelligence Divide: Who is the Most Vulnerable?

The Artificial Intelligence Divide: Who is the Most Vulnerable?

In their article in the journal "New Media & Society", Judith Möller and colleagues describe which social groups could be left behind by developments in artificial intelligence (AI). The authors note that older people and people with a lower level of education are particularly less proficient in dealing with AI applications. The article is available as an open access publication.

Link to the article
 

Abstract
This study investigates users’ artificial intelligence (AI)-related competencies (i.e., AI knowledge, skills, and attitudes) and identifies the vulnerable user groups in the AI-shaped online news and entertainment environment. We surveyed 1088 Dutch citizens over the age of 16 years and identified five user groups through the latent class analysis: the average users, the expert advocates, the expert skeptics, the unskilled skeptics, and the neutral unskilled. The most vulnerable groups with the lowest levels of AI knowledge and AI skills (i.e., unskilled skeptics and neutral unskilled) were mostly older, with lower levels of education and privacy protection skills, than the average users. Overall, the results of this study resonate with the existing findings on the digital divide and provide evidence for an emerging AI divide among users. Finally, the societal implication of this study is discussed, such as the need for education programs and applications of the explainable AI.
 
Wang, C.; Boerman, S. C.; Kroon, A. C.; Möller, J.; de Vreese, C. (2024): The Artificial Intelligence Divide: Who Is the Most Vulnerable? New Media & Society, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1177/14614448241232345
 

The Artificial Intelligence Divide: Who is the Most Vulnerable?

In their article in the journal "New Media & Society", Judith Möller and colleagues describe which social groups could be left behind by developments in artificial intelligence (AI). The authors note that older people and people with a lower level of education are particularly less proficient in dealing with AI applications. The article is available as an open access publication.

Link to the article
 

Abstract
This study investigates users’ artificial intelligence (AI)-related competencies (i.e., AI knowledge, skills, and attitudes) and identifies the vulnerable user groups in the AI-shaped online news and entertainment environment. We surveyed 1088 Dutch citizens over the age of 16 years and identified five user groups through the latent class analysis: the average users, the expert advocates, the expert skeptics, the unskilled skeptics, and the neutral unskilled. The most vulnerable groups with the lowest levels of AI knowledge and AI skills (i.e., unskilled skeptics and neutral unskilled) were mostly older, with lower levels of education and privacy protection skills, than the average users. Overall, the results of this study resonate with the existing findings on the digital divide and provide evidence for an emerging AI divide among users. Finally, the societal implication of this study is discussed, such as the need for education programs and applications of the explainable AI.
 
Wang, C.; Boerman, S. C.; Kroon, A. C.; Möller, J.; de Vreese, C. (2024): The Artificial Intelligence Divide: Who Is the Most Vulnerable? New Media & Society, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1177/14614448241232345
 

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Year of publication

2024

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